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EMGLAB FORUM >10khz sampleing frequency gathers all the motor activity for decomposition?

  Subject:   10khz sampleing frequency gathers all the motor activity for decomposition?
 
From:   joshua wojnas Date:   19 Jan 2010 1:04 pm  
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  In the tutorial section the first article mentions in theory 10khz samples captures all the information of the signal? How is that found out does that work for all the nervous system? How about EEG Decomposition?

"Decomposition can be accomplished using pattern-recognition techniques such as template matching.

In theory, a 10 kHz sampling rate captures all the information in the signal. Interpolation may still be need used to align and compare them accurately."

a reference would be great or how this was calculated.
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  Subject:   Re: 10khz sampleing frequency gathers all the motor activity for decomposition?
 
From:   Kevin McGill Date:   22 Mar 2011 5:56 pm  
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  Hi Joshua,

The 10 kHz sampling rate is based on experience. Some people get acceptable results sampling at 8 kHz. These high sampling rates are needed for intramuscular signals recorded by millimeter-sized electrodes.

Lower sampling rates are acceptable for surface EMG signals, but you can't decompose these signals, at least not using EMGlab.

I'm afraid I don't have any experience with EEG signals.

Kevin


joshua wojnas wrote:
>In the tutorial section the first article mentions in theory 10khz samples captures all the information of the signal? How is that found out does that work for all the nervous system? How about EEG Decomposition?
>
>"Decomposition can be accomplished using pattern-recognition techniques such as template matching.
>
>In theory, a 10 kHz sampling rate captures all the information in the signal. Interpolation may still be need used to align and compare them accurately."
>
>a reference would be great or how this was calculated.
  >> Reply to this message  

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