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EMGLAB FORUM >Can EMG decomposition be done with a very brief contraction, e.g. knee jerk reflex

  Subject:   Can EMG decomposition be done with a very brief contraction, e.g. knee jerk reflex
 
From:   Michael Wong Date:   09 Nov 2009 11:50 am  
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  Hello,

I just wonder that if the EMGLAB could perform a signal decomposition for a very brief muscle contraction like knee jerk reflex if monopolar fine wire electrode is used?
In other words, does EMGLAB require a minimal duration of muscle contraction otherwise the signal decomposition cannot be reliably completed?

Many thanks in advance!
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  Subject:   Re: Can EMG decomposition be done with a very brief contraction, e.g. knee jerk reflex
 
From:   Kevin McGill Date:   10 Nov 2009 11:33 am  
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  Hi Michael,

It's worth a try. In a brief contraction one would expect a burst of activity in which many MUs might fire close together in time, followed perhaps by a period of asynchronous firing. The main problem will be trying to find reliable templates that correspond to single MUs. If the contraction is not too strong, so that there are only a limited number of active MUs, and if the electrode is selective enough, it might be possible to do this. If you recorded several trials from the same subject in the same signal, that might give you more chances to get templates of individual MUs. The automatic decomposition algorithm probably would not work, and so you would need to do the decomposition manually using EMGlab's editing capabilities.

Good luck,
Kevin McGill




Michael Wong wrote:
>Hello,
>
>I just wonder that if the EMGLAB could perform a signal decomposition for a very brief muscle contraction like knee jerk reflex if monopolar fine wire electrode is used?
>In other words, does EMGLAB require a minimal duration of muscle contraction otherwise the signal decomposition cannot be reliably completed?
>
>Many thanks in advance!
  >> Reply to this message  

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