EMGLAB FORUM

EMGLAB FORUM >can sEMG be processed?

  Subject:   can sEMG be processed?
 
From:   YangJun Date:   16 Sep 2008 4:29 am  
Reply via e-mail to YangJun.  
  Hi, i am doing a final year project paper on analysing sEMG signals and i came across your software, emglab. Is it possible for emglab to decompose sEMG signals or does its decompsition algorithms only work for invasive EMG signals?

thanks and regards
YJ
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  Subject:   Re: can sEMG be processed?
 
From:   Kevin McGill Date:   17 Sep 2008 1:33 pm  
 
  Hi YangJun,

EMGLAB is not really intended for surface EMG signals. Conventional SEMG signals recorded using a single pair of electrodes on the skin surface do not usually contain enough specific information to make it possible to distinguish the individual discharges of different motor units. All the MUAPs tend to look more-or-less alike, and they are very broad so that they overlap each other considerably.

Recently there has been interest in recording decomposable EMG signals from the skin surface using more selective electrodes consisting of arrays of small, closely spaced contacts, including high-density arrays with dozens of contacts distributed over the surface of the muscle. EMGLAB might be useful for looking at these signals, but a limitation is the current inability to work with more than one channel at a time.

Good luck with your research,
Kevin McGill


YangJun wrote:
>Hi, i am doing a final year project paper on analysing sEMG signals and i came across your software, emglab. Is it possible for emglab to decompose sEMG signals or does its decompsition algorithms only work for invasive EMG signals?
>
>thanks and regards
>YJ
  >> Reply to this message  

  Subject:   Re: Re: can sEMG be processed?
 
From:   YangJun Date:   18 Sep 2008 2:31 am  
Reply via e-mail to YangJun.  
  Hi Professor Kevin,
thank you so much for your prompt reply. Since the laboratory in my university can only provide me with only an 8-channel eeg machine which can also be used for detecting sEMG signals, i guess EMGLAB will not help much then.
However, can i then ask what are the possible data i can obtain from such sEMG signals other than the usual MF and power spectrum analysis? This is because my supervisor has asked me to research on how can i use sEMG signals to identify specific arm movements like flexion, extension, pronation and supination. So sorry for this simple questions as i am an electrical engineering student who has no prior knowledge of emg analysis whatsoever.

thanks and regards
YangJun

Kevin McGill wrote:
>Hi YangJun,
>
>EMGLAB is not really intended for surface EMG signals. Conventional SEMG signals recorded using a single pair of electrodes on the skin surface do not usually contain enough specific information to make it possible to distinguish the individual discharges of different motor units. All the MUAPs tend to look more-or-less alike, and they are very broad so that they overlap each other considerably.
>
>Recently there has been interest in recording decomposable EMG signals from the skin surface using more selective electrodes consisting of arrays of small, closely spaced contacts, including high-density arrays with dozens of contacts distributed over the surface of the muscle. EMGLAB might be useful for looking at these signals, but a limitation is the current inability to work with more than one channel at a time.
>
>Good luck with your research,
>Kevin McGill
>
>
>YangJun wrote:
>>Hi, i am doing a final year project paper on analysing sEMG signals and i came across your software, emglab. Is it possible for emglab to decompose sEMG signals or does its decompsition algorithms only work for invasive EMG signals?
>>
>>thanks and regards
>>YJ
>
  >> Reply to this message  

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